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You searched for: EV190044 (EV-TRACK ID)

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Experiment number
  • If needed, multiple experiments were identified in a single publication based on differing sample types, separation protocols and/or vesicle types of interest.
Species
  • Species of origin of the EVs.
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
Details EV-TRACK ID Experiment nr. Species Sample type separation protocol First author Year EV-METRIC
EV190044 11/11 Homo sapiens Blood plasma DG
(d)(U)C
qEV
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 100%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
100% (99th percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Blood plasma
Sample origin
Control condition
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C + qEV
Protein markers
EV: CD81/ CD63/ Flotillin1/ CD9
non-EV: ApoAl/ ApoB100
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.11 - 1.18
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Blood plasma
Sample Condition
Control condition
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.05
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Commercial kit
qEV
Characterization: Protein analysis
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Western Blot
Detected EV-associated proteins
Flotillin1/ CD9/ CD63/ CD81
Not detected contaminants
ApoAl/ ApoB100
Characterization: RNA analysis
Proteinase treatment
Moment of Proteinase treatment
After
Proteinase type
Proteinase K
Proteinase concentration
0.045
RNAse treatment
Moment of RNAse treatment
After
RNAse type
RNase A
RNAse concentration
0.16
Characterization: Particle analysis
NTA
Report type
Mean
Reported size (nm)
130
EM
EM-type
Transmission-EM
Image type
Close-up, Wide-field
EV190044 5/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 67%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
67% (93rd percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
Control condition
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV: CD63/ CD9
non-EV: Calnexin
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
Control condition
EV-producing cells
primary neutrophils
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Characterization: Protein analysis
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Western Blot
Detected EV-associated proteins
CD9/ CD63
Not detected contaminants
Calnexin
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012.
Calibration bead size
0.1
EV concentration
Yes
EV190044 6/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 67%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
67% (93rd percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
LPS stimulated
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV: CD63/ CD9
non-EV: Calnexin
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
LPS stimulated
EV-producing cells
primary neutrophils
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Characterization: Protein analysis
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Western Blot
Detected EV-associated proteins
CD9/ CD63
Not detected contaminants
Calnexin
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012.
Calibration bead size
0.1
EV190044 1/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 43%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
43% (71st percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
Control condition
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV:
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
Control condition
EV-producing cells
HUVEC
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012. We applied fluorescence threshold triggering to discriminate PKH67 labeled EV from non-fluorescent noise signals. Forward scatter (FSC) was detected at a 15 25 degree collection angle. Fluorescent polystyrene 100 and 200 nm beads (FluoSpheres, Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA) were used to calibrate the fluorescence and reduced width-FSC settings before each measurement. Samples were measured at maximally 10,000 events per second, which is far below the electronic pulse processing limit of the BD Influx. Serial dilutions of 'peak' fractions were included to control for potential 'invisible swarm' effects
Calibration bead size
0.1
EV concentration
Yes
EV190044 2/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 43%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
43% (71st percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
LPS stimulated
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV:
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
LPS stimulated
EV-producing cells
HUVEC
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012.
Calibration bead size
0.1
Report type
Not Reported
EV concentration
Yes
EV190044 3/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 43%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
43% (71st percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
Control condition
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV:
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
Control condition
EV-producing cells
primary PBMC
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012.
Calibration bead size
0.1
Report type
Not Reported
EV concentration
Yes
EV190044 4/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 43%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
43% (71st percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
LPS stimulated
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV:
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
LPS stimulated
EV-producing cells
primary PBMC
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012.
Calibration bead size
0.1
Report type
Not Reported
EV190044 7/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 43%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
43% (71st percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
Control condition
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV:
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
Control condition
EV-producing cells
red blood cells
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012.
Calibration bead size
0.1
EV concentration
Yes
EV190044 8/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 43%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
43% (71st percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
LPS stimulated
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV:
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
LPS stimulated
EV-producing cells
red blood cells
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012.
Calibration bead size
0.1
EV190044 9/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 43%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
43% (71st percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
Control condition
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV:
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
Control condition
EV-producing cells
platelets
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012.
Calibration bead size
0.1
Report type
Not Reported
EV concentration
Yes
EV190044 10/11 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant DG
(d)(U)C
Driedonks, Tom A.P. 2020 43%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Tom A.P. Driedonks, Sanne Mol, Sanne de Bruin, Anna-Linda Peters, Xiaogang Zhang, Marthe F.S. Lindenbergh, Boukje M. Beuger, Anne-Marieke D. van Stalborch, Thom Spaan, Esther C. de Jong, Erhard van der Vries, Coert Margadant, Robin van Bruggen, Alexander P.J. Vlaar, Tom Groot Kormelink, and Esther N.M. Nolte-‘T Hoen
Journal
J Extracell Vesicles
Abstract
Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood p (show more...)Major efforts are made to characterize the presence of microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA in blood plasma to discover novel disease-associated biomarkers. MiRNAs in plasma are associated to several types of macromolecular structures, including extracellular vesicles (EV), lipoprotein particles (LPP) and ribonucleoprotein particles (RNP). RNAs in these complexes are recovered at variable efficiency by commonly used EV- and RNA isolation methods, which causes biases and inconsistencies in miRNA quantitation. Besides miRNAs, various other non-coding RNA species are contained in EV and present within the pool of plasma extracellular RNA. Members of the Y-RNA family have been detected in EV from various cell types and are among the most abundant non-coding RNA types in plasma. We previously showed that shuttling of full-length Y-RNA into EV released by immune cells is modulated by microbial stimulation. This indicated that Y-RNAs could contribute to the functional properties of EV in immune cell communication and that EV-associated Y-RNAs could have biomarker potential in immune-related diseases. Here, we investigated which macromolecular structures in plasma contain full length Y-RNA and whether the levels of three Y-RNA subtypes in plasma (Y1, Y3 and Y4) change during systemic inflammation. Our data indicate that the majority of full length Y-RNA in plasma is stably associated to EV. Moreover, we discovered that EV from different blood-related cell types contain cell-type-specific Y-RNA subtype ratios. Using a human model for systemic inflammation, we show that the neutrophil-specific Y4/Y3 ratios and PBMC-specific Y3/Y1 ratios were significantly altered after induction of inflammation. The plasma Y-RNA ratios strongly correlated with the number and type of immune cells during systemic inflammation. Cell-type-specific “Y-RNA signatures” in plasma EV can be determined without prior enrichment for EV, and may be further explored as simple and fast test for diagnosis of inflammatory responses or other immune-related diseases. (hide)
EV-METRIC
43% (71st percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample origin
LPS stimulated
Focus vesicles
extracellular vesicle
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • (d)(U)C = (differential) (ultra)centrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
DG + (d)(U)C
Protein markers
EV:
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
EV density (g/ml)
1.10 - 1.16
Show all info
Study aim
Biomarker/Identification of content (omics approaches)
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
Sample Condition
LPS stimulated
EV-producing cells
platelets
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted medium
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability
Yes
Cell viability (%)
Yes
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
centrifugation steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Between 100,000 g and 150,000 g
Obtain an EV pellet :
Yes
Pelleting: time(min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
100000
Density gradient
Density medium
Sucrose
Type
Continuous
Lowest density fraction
0.4 M
Highest density fraction
2.5 M
Total gradient volume, incl. sample (mL)
12
Sample volume (mL)
0.02
Orientation
Bottom-up
Rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Speed (g)
192000
Duration (min)
900
Fraction volume (mL)
1
Fraction processing
Centrifugation
Pelleting: volume per fraction
4
Pelleting: duration (min)
65
Pelleting: rotor type
SW 40 Ti
Pelleting: speed (g)
192000
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Characterization: Particle analysis
Particle analysis: flow cytometry
Flow cytometer type
BD Influx
Hardware adjustment
See van der Vlist, Nature Protocols 2012 and Nolte-'t Hoen, Nanomedicine 2012.
Calibration bead size
0.1
Report type
Not Reported
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