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You searched for: EV110026 (EV-TRACK ID)

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Experiment number
  • If needed, multiple experiments were identified in a single publication based on differing sample types, separation protocols and/or vesicle types of interest.
Species
  • Species of origin of the EVs.
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the different steps of the separation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
Experiment number
  • Experiments differ in Sample type/Vesicle type
Experiment number
  • Experiments differ in Sample type/Vesicle type
Experiment number
  • Experiments differ in Sample type/Vesicle type
Experiment number
  • Experiments differ in Sample type/Vesicle type
Details EV-TRACK ID Experiment nr. Species Sample type separation protocol First author Year EV-METRIC
EV110026 2/4 Homo sapiens Saliva dUC Berckmans RJ 2011 44%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Berckmans RJ, Sturk A, van Tienen LM, Schaap MC, Nieuwland R
Journal
Blood
Abstract
On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, (show more...)On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, which is present on circulating cell-derived vesicles, is noncoagulant under physiologic conditions but prothrombotic under pathologic conditions. Human saliva triggers coagulation, but the mechanism and physiologic relevance are unknown. Because saliva is known to contain TF, we hypothesized that this TF may also be associated with cell-derived vesicles to facilitate coagulation when saliva directly contacts blood. The saliva-induced shortening of the clotting time of autologous plasma and whole blood from healthy subjects (n = 10) proved TF-dependent. This TF was associated with various types of cell-derived vesicles, including microparticles and exosomes. The physiologic function was shown by adding saliva to human pericardial wound blood collected from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Addition of saliva shortened the clotting time from 300 ± 96 to 186 ± 24 seconds (P = .03). Our results show that saliva triggers coagulation, thereby reducing blood loss and the risk of pathogens entering the blood. We postulate that our reflex to lick a wound may be a mechanism to enable TF-exposing vesicles, present in saliva, to aid in the coagulation process and thus protect the organism from entering pathogens. This unique compartmentalization may be highly conserved because also animals lick their wounds. (hide)
EV-METRIC
44% (82nd percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Saliva
Sample origin
DNF
Focus vesicles
Vesicles
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
dUC
Adj. k-factor
472.2 (pelleting)
Protein markers
EV: TF
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
Show all info
Study aim
Function
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Saliva
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
dUC: centrifugation steps
Between 800 g and 10,000 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Pelleting: time(min)
30
Pelleting: rotor type
TLA55
Pelleting: adjusted k-factor
472.2
Characterization: Protein analysis
Western Blot
Detected EV-associated proteins
TF
ELISA
Detected EV-associated proteins
TF
Characterization: Particle analysis
EM
EM-type
immune EM
Proteïns
tissue factor; CD63; CD133
Image type
Close-up, Wide-field
EV110026 4/4 Homo sapiens Saliva dUC Berckmans RJ 2011 44%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Berckmans RJ, Sturk A, van Tienen LM, Schaap MC, Nieuwland R
Journal
Blood
Abstract
On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, (show more...)On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, which is present on circulating cell-derived vesicles, is noncoagulant under physiologic conditions but prothrombotic under pathologic conditions. Human saliva triggers coagulation, but the mechanism and physiologic relevance are unknown. Because saliva is known to contain TF, we hypothesized that this TF may also be associated with cell-derived vesicles to facilitate coagulation when saliva directly contacts blood. The saliva-induced shortening of the clotting time of autologous plasma and whole blood from healthy subjects (n = 10) proved TF-dependent. This TF was associated with various types of cell-derived vesicles, including microparticles and exosomes. The physiologic function was shown by adding saliva to human pericardial wound blood collected from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Addition of saliva shortened the clotting time from 300 ± 96 to 186 ± 24 seconds (P = .03). Our results show that saliva triggers coagulation, thereby reducing blood loss and the risk of pathogens entering the blood. We postulate that our reflex to lick a wound may be a mechanism to enable TF-exposing vesicles, present in saliva, to aid in the coagulation process and thus protect the organism from entering pathogens. This unique compartmentalization may be highly conserved because also animals lick their wounds. (hide)
EV-METRIC
44% (82nd percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Saliva
Sample origin
DNF
Focus vesicles
Vesicles
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
dUC
Adj. k-factor
57.93 (pelleting)
Protein markers
EV: TF
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
Show all info
Study aim
Function
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Saliva
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
dUC: centrifugation steps
Between 800 g and 10,000 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Equal to or above 150,000 g
Pelleting: time(min)
60
Pelleting: rotor type
TLA55
Pelleting: adjusted k-factor
57.93
Characterization: Protein analysis
Western Blot
Detected EV-associated proteins
TF
ELISA
Detected EV-associated proteins
TF
Characterization: Particle analysis
EM
EM-type
immune EM
Proteïns
tissue factor; CD63; CD134
Image type
Close-up, Wide-field
EV110026 1/4 Homo sapiens Blood plasma dUC Berckmans RJ 2011 22%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Berckmans RJ, Sturk A, van Tienen LM, Schaap MC, Nieuwland R
Journal
Blood
Abstract
On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, (show more...)On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, which is present on circulating cell-derived vesicles, is noncoagulant under physiologic conditions but prothrombotic under pathologic conditions. Human saliva triggers coagulation, but the mechanism and physiologic relevance are unknown. Because saliva is known to contain TF, we hypothesized that this TF may also be associated with cell-derived vesicles to facilitate coagulation when saliva directly contacts blood. The saliva-induced shortening of the clotting time of autologous plasma and whole blood from healthy subjects (n = 10) proved TF-dependent. This TF was associated with various types of cell-derived vesicles, including microparticles and exosomes. The physiologic function was shown by adding saliva to human pericardial wound blood collected from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Addition of saliva shortened the clotting time from 300 ± 96 to 186 ± 24 seconds (P = .03). Our results show that saliva triggers coagulation, thereby reducing blood loss and the risk of pathogens entering the blood. We postulate that our reflex to lick a wound may be a mechanism to enable TF-exposing vesicles, present in saliva, to aid in the coagulation process and thus protect the organism from entering pathogens. This unique compartmentalization may be highly conserved because also animals lick their wounds. (hide)
EV-METRIC
22% (60th percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Blood plasma
Sample origin
DNF
Focus vesicles
Vesicles
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
dUC
Adj. k-factor
472.2 (pelleting)
Protein markers
EV: TF
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
Show all info
Study aim
Function
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Blood plasma
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
dUC: centrifugation steps
Between 800 g and 10,000 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Pelleting: time(min)
30
Pelleting: rotor type
TLA55
Pelleting: adjusted k-factor
472.2
Characterization: Protein analysis
Western Blot
Detected EV-associated proteins
TF
ELISA
Detected EV-associated proteins
TF
Characterization: Particle analysis
EV110026 3/4 Homo sapiens Blood plasma dUC Berckmans RJ 2011 22%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Berckmans RJ, Sturk A, van Tienen LM, Schaap MC, Nieuwland R
Journal
Blood
Abstract
On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, (show more...)On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, which is present on circulating cell-derived vesicles, is noncoagulant under physiologic conditions but prothrombotic under pathologic conditions. Human saliva triggers coagulation, but the mechanism and physiologic relevance are unknown. Because saliva is known to contain TF, we hypothesized that this TF may also be associated with cell-derived vesicles to facilitate coagulation when saliva directly contacts blood. The saliva-induced shortening of the clotting time of autologous plasma and whole blood from healthy subjects (n = 10) proved TF-dependent. This TF was associated with various types of cell-derived vesicles, including microparticles and exosomes. The physiologic function was shown by adding saliva to human pericardial wound blood collected from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Addition of saliva shortened the clotting time from 300 ± 96 to 186 ± 24 seconds (P = .03). Our results show that saliva triggers coagulation, thereby reducing blood loss and the risk of pathogens entering the blood. We postulate that our reflex to lick a wound may be a mechanism to enable TF-exposing vesicles, present in saliva, to aid in the coagulation process and thus protect the organism from entering pathogens. This unique compartmentalization may be highly conserved because also animals lick their wounds. (hide)
EV-METRIC
22% (60th percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Separation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Separation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Separation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Blood plasma
Sample origin
DNF
Focus vesicles
Vesicles
Separation protocol
Separation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the separation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
dUC
Adj. k-factor
57.93 (pelleting)
Protein markers
EV: TF
non-EV:
Proteomics
no
Show all info
Study aim
Function
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Blood plasma
Separation Method
Differential ultracentrifugation
dUC: centrifugation steps
Between 800 g and 10,000 g
Between 10,000 g and 50,000 g
Equal to or above 150,000 g
Pelleting: time(min)
60
Pelleting: rotor type
TLA55
Pelleting: adjusted k-factor
57.93
Characterization: Protein analysis
Western Blot
Detected EV-associated proteins
TF
ELISA
Detected EV-associated proteins
TF
Characterization: Particle analysis
1 - 4 of 4
  • CM = Commercial method
  • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
  • DG = density gradient
  • UF = ultrafiltration
  • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
EV-TRACK ID
EV110026
species
Homo sapiens
sample type
Saliva
Saliva
Blood plasma
Blood plasma
separation protocol
dUC
dUC
dUC
dUC
Exp. nr.
2
4
1
3
EV-METRIC %
44
44
22
22