Search > Results

You searched for: EV170022 (EV-TRACK ID)

Showing 1 - 5 of 5

Experiment number
  • If needed, multiple experiments were identified in a single publication based on differing sample types, isolation protocols and/or vesicle types of interest.
Species
  • Species of origin of the EVs.
Isolation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the different steps of the isolation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
Experiment number
  • Experiments differ in Sample type
Experiment number
  • Experiments differ in Sample type
Experiment number
  • Experiments differ in Sample type
Experiment number
  • Experiments differ in Sample type
Experiment number
  • Experiments differ in Sample type
Details EV-TRACK ID Experiment nr. Species Sample type Isolation protocol First author Year EV-METRIC
EV170022 1/5 Streptococcus pneumoniae Cell culture supernatant dUC
Filtration
SEC
UF
Volgers C 2017 14%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Volgers C, Benedikter BJ, Grauls GE, Hellebrand PHM, Savelkoul PHM, Stassen FRM
Journal
FEMS Microbiol Lett
Abstract
Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (show more...)Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by stimulating mucus production in the airways. This increased mucus production and other symptoms are often alleviated when patients are treated with mucolytics such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Moreover, NAC has been suggested to inhibit bacterial growth. Bacteria can release membrane vesicles (MVs) in response to stress, and recent studies report a role for these proinflammatory MVs in the pathogenesis of airways disease. Yet, until now it is not clear whether NAC also affects the release of these MVs. This study set out to determine whether NAC, at concentrations reached during high-dose nebulization, affects bacterial growth and MV release of the respiratory pathogens non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), Moraxella catarrhalis (Mrc), Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psa). We observed that NAC exerted a strong bacteriostatic effect, but also induced the release of proinflammatory MVs by NTHi, Mrc and Psa, but not by Spn. Interestingly, NAC also markedly blunted the release of TNF-α by naive macrophages in response to MVs. This suggests that the application of NAC by nebulization at a high dosage may be beneficial for patients with airway conditions associated with bacterial infections. (hide)
EV-METRIC
14% (44th percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Isolation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Isolation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Isolation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Focus vesicles
membrane vesicle
Isolation protocol
Isolation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the isolation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
dUC + Filtration + SEC + UF
Protein markers
EV: Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen
non-EV: None
Proteomics
no
Show all info
Study aim
Function, Biogenesis/cargo sorting
Sample
Species
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
EV-producing cells
Streptococcus pneumoniae
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted serum
Origin
Control condition
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability (%)
95
Isolation Method
Differential ultra centrifugation
Differential UC: filtering steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 800 g and 10,000 g
Filtration steps
0.22µm or 0.2µm
Ultra filtration
Cut-off size (kDa)
10
Membrane type
Regenerated cellulose
Size-exclusion chromatography
Total column volume (mL)
10.5
Sample volume/column (mL)
0.5
Resin type
Sepharose CL-2B
Characterization: Protein analysis
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Flow cytometry specific beads
Selected surface protein(s)
Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen
Characterization: Particle analysis
TRPS
EV concentration
Yes
EV170022 2/5 Moraxella catarrhalis Cell culture supernatant dUC
Filtration
SEC
UF
Volgers C 2017 14%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Volgers C, Benedikter BJ, Grauls GE, Hellebrand PHM, Savelkoul PHM, Stassen FRM
Journal
FEMS Microbiol Lett
Abstract
Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (show more...)Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by stimulating mucus production in the airways. This increased mucus production and other symptoms are often alleviated when patients are treated with mucolytics such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Moreover, NAC has been suggested to inhibit bacterial growth. Bacteria can release membrane vesicles (MVs) in response to stress, and recent studies report a role for these proinflammatory MVs in the pathogenesis of airways disease. Yet, until now it is not clear whether NAC also affects the release of these MVs. This study set out to determine whether NAC, at concentrations reached during high-dose nebulization, affects bacterial growth and MV release of the respiratory pathogens non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), Moraxella catarrhalis (Mrc), Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psa). We observed that NAC exerted a strong bacteriostatic effect, but also induced the release of proinflammatory MVs by NTHi, Mrc and Psa, but not by Spn. Interestingly, NAC also markedly blunted the release of TNF-α by naive macrophages in response to MVs. This suggests that the application of NAC by nebulization at a high dosage may be beneficial for patients with airway conditions associated with bacterial infections. (hide)
EV-METRIC
14% (44th percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Isolation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Isolation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Isolation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Focus vesicles
membrane vesicle
Isolation protocol
Isolation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the isolation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
dUC + Filtration + SEC + UF
Protein markers
EV: Moraxella catarrhalis antigen
non-EV: None
Proteomics
no
Show all info
Study aim
Function, Biogenesis/cargo sorting
Sample
Species
Moraxella catarrhalis
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
EV-producing cells
Moraxella catarrhalis
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted serum
Origin
Control condition
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability (%)
95
Isolation Method
Differential ultra centrifugation
Differential UC: filtering steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 800 g and 10,000 g
Filtration steps
0.22µm or 0.2µm
Ultra filtration
Cut-off size (kDa)
10
Membrane type
Regenerated cellulose
Size-exclusion chromatography
Total column volume (mL)
10.5
Sample volume/column (mL)
0.5
Resin type
Sepharose CL-2B
Characterization: Protein analysis
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Flow cytometry specific beads
Selected surface protein(s)
Moraxella catarrhalis antigen
Characterization: Particle analysis
TRPS
EV concentration
Yes
EV170022 3/5 Haemophilus influenzae Cell culture supernatant dUC
Filtration
SEC
UF
Volgers C 2017 14%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Volgers C, Benedikter BJ, Grauls GE, Hellebrand PHM, Savelkoul PHM, Stassen FRM
Journal
FEMS Microbiol Lett
Abstract
Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (show more...)Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by stimulating mucus production in the airways. This increased mucus production and other symptoms are often alleviated when patients are treated with mucolytics such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Moreover, NAC has been suggested to inhibit bacterial growth. Bacteria can release membrane vesicles (MVs) in response to stress, and recent studies report a role for these proinflammatory MVs in the pathogenesis of airways disease. Yet, until now it is not clear whether NAC also affects the release of these MVs. This study set out to determine whether NAC, at concentrations reached during high-dose nebulization, affects bacterial growth and MV release of the respiratory pathogens non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), Moraxella catarrhalis (Mrc), Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psa). We observed that NAC exerted a strong bacteriostatic effect, but also induced the release of proinflammatory MVs by NTHi, Mrc and Psa, but not by Spn. Interestingly, NAC also markedly blunted the release of TNF-α by naive macrophages in response to MVs. This suggests that the application of NAC by nebulization at a high dosage may be beneficial for patients with airway conditions associated with bacterial infections. (hide)
EV-METRIC
14% (44th percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Isolation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Isolation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Isolation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Focus vesicles
membrane vesicle
Isolation protocol
Isolation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the isolation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
dUC + Filtration + SEC + UF
Protein markers
EV: non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae antigen
non-EV: None
Proteomics
no
Show all info
Study aim
Function, Biogenesis/cargo sorting
Sample
Species
Haemophilus influenzae
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
EV-producing cells
non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted serum
Origin
Control condition
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability (%)
95
Isolation Method
Differential ultra centrifugation
Differential UC: filtering steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 800 g and 10,000 g
Filtration steps
0.22µm or 0.2µm
Ultra filtration
Cut-off size (kDa)
10
Membrane type
Regenerated cellulose
Size-exclusion chromatography
Total column volume (mL)
10.5
Sample volume/column (mL)
0.5
Resin type
Sepharose CL-2B
Characterization: Protein analysis
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Flow cytometry specific beads
Selected surface protein(s)
non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae antigen
Characterization: Particle analysis
TRPS
EV concentration
Yes
EV170022 4/5 Homo sapiens Cell culture supernatant dUC
Filtration
SEC
UF
Volgers C 2017 14%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Volgers C, Benedikter BJ, Grauls GE, Hellebrand PHM, Savelkoul PHM, Stassen FRM
Journal
FEMS Microbiol Lett
Abstract
Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (show more...)Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by stimulating mucus production in the airways. This increased mucus production and other symptoms are often alleviated when patients are treated with mucolytics such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Moreover, NAC has been suggested to inhibit bacterial growth. Bacteria can release membrane vesicles (MVs) in response to stress, and recent studies report a role for these proinflammatory MVs in the pathogenesis of airways disease. Yet, until now it is not clear whether NAC also affects the release of these MVs. This study set out to determine whether NAC, at concentrations reached during high-dose nebulization, affects bacterial growth and MV release of the respiratory pathogens non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), Moraxella catarrhalis (Mrc), Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psa). We observed that NAC exerted a strong bacteriostatic effect, but also induced the release of proinflammatory MVs by NTHi, Mrc and Psa, but not by Spn. Interestingly, NAC also markedly blunted the release of TNF-α by naive macrophages in response to MVs. This suggests that the application of NAC by nebulization at a high dosage may be beneficial for patients with airway conditions associated with bacterial infections. (hide)
EV-METRIC
14% (44th percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Isolation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Isolation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Isolation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Focus vesicles
membrane vesicle
Isolation protocol
Isolation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the isolation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
dUC + Filtration + SEC + UF
Protein markers
EV: CD63/ CD81
non-EV: None
Proteomics
no
Show all info
Study aim
Function, Biogenesis/cargo sorting
Sample
Species
Homo sapiens
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
EV-producing cells
THP1
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted serum
Origin
Control condition
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability (%)
95
Isolation Method
Differential ultra centrifugation
Differential UC: filtering steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 800 g and 10,000 g
Filtration steps
0.22µm or 0.2µm
Ultra filtration
Cut-off size (kDa)
10
Membrane type
Regenerated cellulose
Size-exclusion chromatography
Total column volume (mL)
10.5
Sample volume/column (mL)
0.5
Resin type
Sepharose CL-2B
Characterization: Protein analysis
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Flow cytometry specific beads
Selected surface protein(s)
CD63
Characterization: Particle analysis
TRPS
EV concentration
Yes
EV170022 5/5 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell culture supernatant dUC
Filtration
SEC
UF
Volgers C 2017 14%

Study summary

Full title
All authors
Volgers C, Benedikter BJ, Grauls GE, Hellebrand PHM, Savelkoul PHM, Stassen FRM
Journal
FEMS Microbiol Lett
Abstract
Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (show more...)Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by stimulating mucus production in the airways. This increased mucus production and other symptoms are often alleviated when patients are treated with mucolytics such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Moreover, NAC has been suggested to inhibit bacterial growth. Bacteria can release membrane vesicles (MVs) in response to stress, and recent studies report a role for these proinflammatory MVs in the pathogenesis of airways disease. Yet, until now it is not clear whether NAC also affects the release of these MVs. This study set out to determine whether NAC, at concentrations reached during high-dose nebulization, affects bacterial growth and MV release of the respiratory pathogens non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), Moraxella catarrhalis (Mrc), Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psa). We observed that NAC exerted a strong bacteriostatic effect, but also induced the release of proinflammatory MVs by NTHi, Mrc and Psa, but not by Spn. Interestingly, NAC also markedly blunted the release of TNF-α by naive macrophages in response to MVs. This suggests that the application of NAC by nebulization at a high dosage may be beneficial for patients with airway conditions associated with bacterial infections. (hide)
EV-METRIC
14% (44th percentile of all experiments on the same sample type)
 Reported
 Not reported
 Not applicable
EV-enriched proteins
Protein analysis: analysis of three or more EV-enriched proteins
non EV-enriched protein
Protein analysis: assessment of a non-EV-enriched protein
qualitative and quantitative analysis
Particle analysis: implementation of both qualitative and quantitative methods
electron microscopy images
Particle analysis: inclusion of a widefield and close-up electron microscopy image
density gradient
Isolation method: density gradient, at least as validation of results attributed to EVs
EV density
Isolation method: reporting of obtained EV density
ultracentrifugation specifics
Isolation method: reporting of g-forces, duration and rotor type of ultracentrifugation steps
antibody specifics
Protein analysis: antibody clone/reference number and dilution
lysate preparation
Protein analysis: lysis buffer composition
Study data
Sample type
Cell culture supernatant
Focus vesicles
membrane vesicle
Isolation protocol
Isolation protocol
  • Gives a short, non-chronological overview of the
    different steps of the isolation protocol.
    • dUC = differential ultracentrifugation
    • DG = density gradient
    • UF = ultrafiltration
    • SEC = size-exclusion chromatography
dUC + Filtration + SEC + UF
Protein markers
EV: Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigen
non-EV: None
Proteomics
no
Show all info
Study aim
Function, Biogenesis/cargo sorting
Sample
Species
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Sample Type
Cell culture supernatant
EV-producing cells
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
EV-harvesting Medium
EV-depleted serum
Origin
Control condition
Preparation of EDS
overnight (16h) at >=100,000g
Cell viability (%)
95
Isolation Method
Differential ultra centrifugation
Differential UC: filtering steps
Below or equal to 800 g
Between 800 g and 10,000 g
Filtration steps
0.22µm or 0.2µm
Ultra filtration
Cut-off size (kDa)
10
Membrane type
Regenerated cellulose
Size-exclusion chromatography
Total column volume (mL)
10.5
Sample volume/column (mL)
0.5
Resin type
Sepharose CL-2B
Characterization: Protein analysis
Protein Concentration Method
Not determined
Flow cytometry specific beads
Selected surface protein(s)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigen
Characterization: Particle analysis
TRPS
EV concentration
Yes
1 - 5 of 5